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 With our system, you can design a training plan that's customized to fit your current level of activity and fitness. Get started with just 5 easy steps.

1. Identify yourself.  
Go to the Settings, and identify what kind of athlete you are.

2. Plug in your goal. On the Goals and Results Page, select “+NEW GOAL."

3. Tell us about a racing history. Click  “+NEW RACE” and plug in a recent race time.

4. Design your workout schedule. On the Schedule & History page,  tell us about how much exercise you’re currently doing, and tell us when you’d like to workout and rest.

5. Sync your activity tracker. Movecoach syncs with many popular activity trackers. When you sync your service, and your miles will automatically be uploaded to your Movecoach or Runcoach log. Movecoach and Runcoach sync with Garmin, Strava, Apple Health, RunKeeper, GoogleFit, FitBit.. To learn more, click here.

6. Ask for help. Our experts and coaches are here to answer your questions about training, nutrition, and technical issues.  Reach out to us by tapping Support on your Mobile App or writing to us at coach@movecoach.com

Modified by Cally Macumber, 5/29/2023




crosstrainingIf you’re a seasoned runner, you're likely familiar with the energizing feeling of hitting the pavement or exploring nature's trails. But, did you know that incorporating cross-training into your routine can take your running to the next level? Cross-training offers an abundance of benefits, including improved performance and reduced injury risk. In this blog post, we'll dive into the world of cross-training for runners, exploring the ideal activities to complement your training and providing practical tips for integrating cross-training into your training plan.

But first, what is cross-training?

Cross-training involves participating in alternative exercises and activities that supplement your primary sport, in this case, running. While running is an exceptional cardiovascular and lower-body strengthening activity, it can also lead to overuse injuries and muscular imbalances. Cross-training addresses these concerns by targeting different muscle groups, enhancing overall fitness, and mitigating burnout.

What are optimal cross-training activities for runners?

When it comes to cross-training, not all activities are created equal. The ideal cross-training exercises for runners should complement running, enhance cardiovascular fitness, improve muscular strength and endurance, and minimize joint impact. Here are some highly effective options to consider:

  1. Cycling: A low-impact activity that develops lower-body strength, boosts cardiovascular fitness, and enhances endurance. By pedaling through varying terrains, you'll strengthen your leg muscles while minimizing stress on your joints.

  2. Swimming: Training that offers the experience of a full-body workout. It enhances cardiovascular fitness, builds upper-body strength, and promotes muscular endurance. The water reduces impact, making swimming an excellent choice for recovery and injury prevention.

  3. Strength Training: Engaging in strength training exercises, such as weightlifting, bodyweight exercises, or resistance training, is instrumental in fortifying muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Focus on exercises that target core stability, hip strength, glute activation, and leg muscles to improve running form and prevent injuries.

  4. Yoga and Pilates: These mind-body practices contribute to overall fitness by improving flexibility, balance, body awareness, and stability. Incorporating yoga or Pilates sessions into your routine can enhance recovery, reduce muscle imbalances, and provide mental benefits like stress reduction and improved focus.

How can you integrate cross-training into your training plan?

It is essential to integrate cross-training into your training plan strategically. Follow these practical tips for seamless integration:

  1. Define your objectives, whether it's improving speed, endurance, or injury prevention.

  2. Strike a balance between running and cross-training sessions by considering your current fitness level, training volume, and recovery needs. Aim for two to three cross-training sessions per week alongside your running workouts.

  3. Embrace a diverse range of cross-training activities to target different muscle groups, prevent overuse injuries, and prevent boredom - and rotate activities.

  4. Listen to your body! If an activity causes discomfort or hinders your running performance, modify or replace it with a more suitable alternative.

What are the benefits of cross-training?

Integrating cross-training into your running routine offers a plethora of benefits:

  1. Enhanced Overall Fitness: Cross-training improves cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, flexibility, and balance, creating a well-rounded athletic foundation.

  2. Injury Prevention: By addressing muscular imbalances and reducing repetitive strain on specific muscle groups, cross-training lowers the risk of overuse injuries that are common among runners.

  3. Accelerated Recovery: Engaging in low-impact activities like swimming or yoga on rest days promotes active recovery, aids in muscle repair, and facilitates optimal performance during running workouts.

  4. Mental Refreshment: Cross-training injects variety and excitement into your training regimen, preventing monotony and keeping your mental motivation high.

You'll enhance your overall fitness and correct imbalances by embracing cross-training activities that complement running. So, lace up your running shoes, dive into the pool, or grab a set of weights - let the power of cross-training unlock your running potential.



From Winter Obstacles to Marathon Triumphs: Discover the Secrets to Consistent Success in Running at 58
Success_Story_May
Upcoming major milestones:
Heldeburg To Hudson Half in April - Marine Corps Marathon in October.

What is the secret to your success? Consistency is the key. Don't let excuses limit your results!

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? Being in upstate NY, winter weather is the biggest obstacle. Some days, outdoor running is just not possible. As much as we do not like treadmills, it is a must to have here. That's my solution.

What is the most rewarding part of training? At 58 years old, and after having smoked for 25 years when I was younger, the most rewarding part is accomplishing things I never thought I would ever be able to do. Some of my rewards are health based.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? Stay consistent. Don't let excuses get in the way of your success. Tell people why and how you were able to do it instead of listing all the excuses why you couldn't.

Anything else you would like to share? It is more beneficial to set lofty goals and fail than to set low goals and succeed.

What feedback would you offer on the Runcoach experience? Utilize the tools you have in your toolbox. They work. Also rely on the years of experience the coaches have.




Meet the Marathon

Written by Cally Macumber April 23, 2023

Marathon training requires a commitment to consistency and dedication to push through the physical and mental challenges. Whether you're a seasoned runner looking to tackle your first marathon or a newbie seeking a new fitness challenge, here's a guide to get you started on your marathon training journey. 

What is a Marathon?

A marathon is a race that covers a distance of 2MarathonI6.2 miles or 42.195 kilometers. It originated from the Greek legend of Pheidippides, who is said to have run from the Battle of Marathon to Athens to deliver news of victory, thus inspiring the modern-day marathon race. Today, marathons are held worldwide and attract participants of all ages and abilities.

Getting Started 

Before embarking on marathon training, it's important to establish a base of running fitness. This means having a regular running routine and gradually increasing mileage over time. We recommend a gradual increase in weekly mileage of no more than 10% to avoid overuse injuries.

Building the Right Training Plan

When we build your training plan, we consider your current fitness level, running experience, and time availability for training. We build a plan that aligns with your goals and abilities. A training plan should incorporate a mix of easy runs, long runs, tempo runs, and speed workouts to build endurance, speed, and strength.

Incorporating Cross-Training

Cross-training, or incorporating other forms of exercise into your training routine, can be beneficial for marathon training. Activities such as cycling, swimming, or yoga can help improve cardiovascular fitness, build strength, and prevent injuries from overuse. Cross-training can also provide variety to your training routine and help prevent burnout.

Prioritizing Recovery

Recovery is a critical aspect of marathon training as it allows your body to rest and repair between workouts. Incorporate rest days into your training plan and prioritize recovery activities such as stretching, foam rolling, and massage. Listening to your body and giving it the rest it needs can help prevent overtraining and reduce the risk of injuries.

Staying Motivated

Marathon training can be physically and mentally challenging, so it's essential to stay motivated and focused on your goals. Surround yourself with supportive people, join a running group or find a training partner, and track your progress to stay accountable. Celebrate your successes along the way, and remember to enjoy the journey, not just the destination.



Matthew McLane Crushes His Personal Best and Qualifies for Boston Marathon with a Sub-3 Hour Finish!
RuncoachSuccess
Sport Running Major milestone: Ran my first sub-3hour marathon last Sunday-March 19th. It was my 9th marathon since 2018. My goal for 2023 was to run a "sub 3 in '23" and to get a BQ time. I did both and I'm super stoked!

What is the secret to your success? Running consistently. I ran every day (at least 1 mile) from Nov 20th, 2022 to March 19th, 2023. A 120 day Run Streak. I didn't start the streak with that in mind. I was just trying to run streak out the rest of 2022, but then I kept going because I noticed I was able to recovery more quickly after long or speed runs.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? Building up the endurance to run a sub 7-min mile. The long runs were key to callusing the legs for 26 miles. I ran a stretch of three consecutive Sunday long runs of 23 miles, it was hard starting those runs knowing I had to do it all again the next week.

What is the most rewarding part of training? See that time--2hr 56min 42sec!!! Knowing during that last mile of the marathon that I was going to make my goals of sub3 and a BQ. Very rewarding! Also, getting in shape and losing extra pounds is great as well!

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? Start slow, start easy. Be kind to yourself. Some runs are going to suck and some runs are going to be great. It's the ebb and flow of this great sport!

Anything else you would like to share? I've used the Runcoach training app for 8 of my 9 marathons. Love the schedule set up and the ability to change it. My first marathon was a 3hr 47min and last Sunday I ran a 2hr 56min!




Selecting the correct pair of running shoes can be a crucial factor in improving performance and preventing injury. Here are my top recommendations for athletes looking to enhance their overall running experience:runningshoes
  • Beginners: Comfort, support, and durability are the three most important factors for beginners. Choose shoes with good cushioning and shock absorption to reduce impact on your joints. It is best to visit a running specialty store where they can recommend shoes based on your specific needs. Shoes that may work well for beginners include the Brooks Ghost or Asics Gel-Nimbus.
  • Overpronators: If you have flat feet or tend to overpronate, look for shoes with good arch support and motion control. Choose shoes with a firm midsole and supportive structure to prevent excessive inward rolling of the feet. Shoes that may work well for overpronators include the Brooks Adrenaline, Asics Kayano, and Saucony Guide.
  • Supinators: If you have high arches or tend to supinate, choose shoes with good cushioning and flexibility. Look for shoes with a soft midsole and a wide toe box to allow for natural foot movement. Shoes that may work well for supinators include the Nike Zoom Vomero, Asics Gel-Cumulus, and New Balance Fresh Foam 1080.
  • Trail Runners: If you plan to run on rugged terrain, choose shoes with good traction and stability. Look for shoes with a durable outsole, protective toe cap, and good grip. Shoes that may work well for trail runners include the Salomon Speedcross, Altra Lone Peak, and Brooks Cascadia.
  • Racers (Road): If you're looking to improve race day performance, choose shoes that are lightweight and responsive. Look for shoes with a minimal design and good traction for quick starts and explosive movements. Shoes that may work well for racing include the Nike Vaporfly, Newton Distance+, or the Brooks Hyperion Elite.
  • Minimalists: Minimalist running can be risky, but if you want to try it out, choose shoes that provide a natural and lightweight feel. Look for shoes with a minimal design and a low heel-to-toe drop to encourage a forefoot or midfoot strike. Shoes that may work well for minimalist runners include the Newton Distance or the New Balance Minimus.

When choosing running shoes, it is important to consider your individual needs and preferences. Take the time to try on different shoes, while also considering your running style and foot shape. By choosing the right pair of shoes, you can ensure a comfortable and successful running experience. Happy (Shoe) Hunting!



Conquer Race Week Jitters

Written by Cally Macumber February 20, 2023

You have done all the hard work, sacrificed precious time and energy along the way and now race week is here.  Your nerves run wild exacerbated by the taper and fewer miles.  Don’t worry, here’s how to push through and keep your eyes are on the prize!
conquer_race_week_jitters

As race week inches nearer, let's take a deep breath and keep these considerations top of mind:

1) Remind yourself that the hardest work is done and you've already won! You've been consistent, remained disciplined with the "small things" and completed the workouts and miles, despite hectic schedules and every day life challenges. Congratulations - you took the journey and won! Throughout the week prior to your goal race, go through your training log and remember the hard workouts, long runs, the grit and tenacity you've shown again and again! You have built the strength inside of you that will help you push you through race weekend to the finish!

2) Relax - you deserve it! It's okay to back off your total volume. You’ve begun your tapering for this event, and you can trust our recommendations to back off your total weekly mileage while keeping some intensity on any strides/tune up workouts you have on the schedule.

3) Study up! As you approach race weekend, it can be helpful to study up on the course. If you've already done this - awesome! If you haven't - no worries! For an endurance race, you're bound to run into some changes in the course (hills, twists and turns, surface changes with sidewalks, roads, dirt, etc.). Breaking down your race into chunks and mentally preparing yourself to know when you can dig a little more on a hill or relax on some downhills can not only help with your race strategy and energy conservation, but also break up the race into chunks so it's not so daunting.

For those almost there, we're so excited for you! You're going to prove to yourself just how limitless you are.

See you at the finish line!



The early mornings, long workouts and countless miles are the engines that drive an athlete from the start to the finish line, but how do you fuel for the big day?

My name is Rosie Edwards. I am a professional marathoner from Great Britain and running coach. rosie

Recently, I had a fascinating conversation with a professional cycling coach. I was wanted to learn about the elite cycling world and their training. He emphasized that attention to recovery was paramount compared to the training itself.

I intuitively knew that nutrition and hydration are vital for not only competition, but for recovery into the next training session. Training at its simplest is stress, response, and adaptation. Appropriate hydration and nutrition (ie. Fueling) is paramount for the optimal response = improved fitness.

Glycogen (our body’s form of carbohydrate) is the main energy for our working muscles while it also assists in fat metabolism. In addition, glucose is the primary fuel for the brain. If the body is glycogen depleted then this can lead to physical (decreased force production, increased soreness, increased muscle weakness) and cognitive impairment.

Picture the last 10 km of a marathon when it is “go” time. If your cognitive function is impaired and your glycogen stores are depleted, responding to your competition's moves and staying engaged will certainly become a challenge.

How does fueling look for me?

Before the race and within training:

I aim for 7-10 g of carbohydrate/kg/day when in peak training. I lean towards low glycemic index or GI (slow release) carbohydrates including whole grains, fruits, vegetables, sweet potatoes, and lots of oats. Low GI is my preferred choice for preparation to avoid spiking my insulin levels too drastically. However, on race day or while training, high GI is preferred for fast energy.

On my heavier training days where the marathon workouts are longer and I have an additional strength session, I will be on the upper end of consumption in order to enhance recovery. On a lighter day that does not precede a hard workout, I will aim for 7 g/kg alongside 1-1.6g/kg of protein and healthy fats.

For those who train at altitude full-time or intermittently, protein is especially important as it aids in the formation of red blood cells. When training at higher elevations for a prolonged period of time or for Sunday long runs 2g/kg per day may be beneficial.

My pre-race my routine does not alter too much:

I will try to ingest the upper limit of carbohydrates before a race. I like to take some of this in the form of a fruit juice or sports drinks rather than heavy carbohydrate-dense foods.  I always consume a protein and healthy fat included the night before. Race morning is simple: oats and honey.

I have been lucky enough to work with Nuun Hydration for the last 18 months. This has been a game-changer. I hyper-hydrate 2 hours prior to my marathon by drinking 2-3 tabs in 20fl Oz of water to ensure that my electrolytes are topped up before the start. Hyper-hydration is not something I would practice daily but before a particularly hot or long workout, I will.

When deciding how many carbohydrates to take in during the race I used a breath analysis test at LEOMO to measure carbohydrate oxidation. This occurs when we burn carbohydrate for fuel.

During the race, I take 48 g of carbohydrates per hour in the form of Nuun Endurance which I mix with 24 oz of water. I aim to consume fluids ~5 km (~20 mins). This setup provides me with a perfect blend of fast-release energy and hydration in addition to topping off my electrolytes in order to eliminate the risk of cramps. I make sure to practice every new fueling strategy in each marathon buildup multiple times before race day.  Our team is notorious for placing random tables around the Boulder reservoir to practice our bottle pick up and fueling. Sorry if we’ve ever blocked your car!

After the race:

Ahhh! The time we can enjoy all the foods we have missed.

Personally, I struggle for many hours after a race or hard session to ingest solid food so I always opt for a smoothie. I blend 25 g of protein powder, almond milk, spinach, frozen berries, and a banana and aim to drink it as quickly as I can. Adding a frozen component can help to decrease your core temperature and aid recovery. This provides me with 50 g of carbohydrate and 25 g of protein (2:1 ratio) immediately. I then aim to eat a good source of antioxidants, fat, and protein to decrease inflammation within an hour.  Avocado, spinach, and eggs on toast was made for this.

In addition to quantity, the most important piece is figuring out which fuel will elicit the best response from your body. More carbohydrates can be digested when glucose and fructose are ingested together because they are absorbed via different routes in the intestine. However, some people have difficulty absorbing fructose. Like many ingredients in a sports drink fructose is a simple sugar known as a monosaccharide. However, if the cells on the surface of your intestines are unable to break down the fructose efficiently malabsorption occurs. Not only will your body struggle to absorb it efficiently, but you may also experience the dreaded “tempo tummy”. Nausea and headaches can also ensue. Surprisingly it affects 1 in 3 people.

If you have experienced any of these issues during training or racing it may be advisable to try some products which do not contain fructose.  Nuun Endurance is a non-fructose based equivalent. It’s very much a case of trial and error but beginning an informed self-study from day one of your build-up will give you the best shot of reaching the finish line feeling great.

For more info, please don’t hesitate to reach out: rosie@runcoach.com. Happy fueling!



NYRR athlete, Frank Carter, joins us to talk about his recent accomplishments and learnings.

Sport Running Major milestone: I was able to run a marathon 33 minutes faster than my personal best. And it’s all because of the coaching app.Frank_Carter__1
What is the secret to your success? I am terrible at planning and sticking to a strict run schedule. This year I trusted the coach and made sure to follow what he said and just that alone made all the difference.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? My biggest obstacle was scheduling runs and not knowing what distances my long runs should be. The coach app helped me know what I would need to run and that I should take rest days. I didn’t want to over do it, so I made sure to never go over the mileage too much.

What is the most rewarding part of training? Honestly, the rewarding part was getting all new personal records at almost every run. The most rewarding part was when I was running my marathon and I realized I was much better prepared this time. And, when I realized I was so close to getting a sub 4 hour marathon (I was over by 33 seconds and I know exactly where those seconds were). Nothing felt better than crossing the finish line knowing I trained for this and it was all worth it.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? Trust the coaches. They absolutely know what they are doing and it shows. I used the Runcoach app twice now. The first time I didn’t fully listen to it. The second time I did and it helped more than I could have hoped for.

Anything else you would like to share? I registered for the app at the middle of training for a marathon. I realized that I was a month behind in my training and I needed guidance. I registered and explained to coach Tom all the different runs I had, and my concern that I was behind in my long run distances. Coach Tom immediately adjusted my runs. It was intimidating that I had to start my long runs at 12 miles that weekend, but I knew I could do it. With each long run and each daily run, I felt more and more confident in my running abilities. I will definitely be using the coach app again next year!



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